The People Issue

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The People Issue

Washington City Paper, November 6, 2015

Excerpt: Veronica O. Davis looks out the window of a coffee shop and declares, with a smile, “Oh, there goes one of my projects!” She’s talking about a bus ad for Vision Zero, a traffic-safety initiative spearheaded by the District Department of Transportation, for which Davis consults. The ad’s branding is a key to how Davis, the cofounder of consulting firm Nspiregreen, thinks about D.C.: as an urban center where people get around in different yet coexisting ways. An avid cyclist herself, Davis also co-founded Black Women Bike in 2011. 

Full Article: Here

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Inspiring People: Veronica O. Davis

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Inspiring People: Veronica O. Davis

Black Urbanist, November 2, 2014

Excerpt: There are tons of Jills-of-all trades out here. Moms, daughters, sisters, cousins, people juggling a lot of hats and doing it well. You really see that when it comes to blogging. And my first pick for my new Inspiring People Series is just one of many who makes the juggling act look easy and fabulous.

Full Article: Here

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Meet The Women Trying To Change Perceptions About Black Bikers

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Meet The Women Trying To Change Perceptions About Black Bikers

ThinkProgress, October 30, 2014

Excerpt: In 2011, Veronica O. Davis was out for a bike ride around Potomac Gardens Apartments, located in a predominantly black DC neighborhood, when she heard a little girl squeal, “Mommy, look at that black lady on a bike!”

In the time since then, Davis’s group, Black Women Bike DC, has united a once-unnoticed contingent of cyclists in the DC metropolitan area. What started as an effort on social media to demystify the notion that black women ride bikes eventually turned into a movement that has grown more than 1,500 strong.

Full Article: Here

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Message for Getting People to Bike Need to be Revamped

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Message for Getting People to Bike Need to be Revamped

Mobility Lab, October 6, 2014

Excerpt: Veronica O. Davis thinks “bike to work” is the wrong message.

“Bike advocates need to focus on recreational trips. If you start off with, hey, you should bike to work, it becomes overwhelming for a lot of people. But if you start with getting people who have access to a bike to go for a ride with you on a trail, they might eventually start to ride to the grocery store or to work.”

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